Wales bans electric shock dog collars

by Darren Jamieson on March 24, 2010

electric_dog_training_collarNot usually known for its leading the way with European policies, the small country of Wales has become the first in Europe to place a ban on the use of electric shock dog collars, which up until now have been used to train dogs. The ban was passed yesterday by the Welsh Assembly, and came into force at midnight last night. Anyone caught using one of the collars on a cat or dog could face six months in prison, or a fine of £20,000.

The ban on the electric shock collars was supported by both the Kennel Club and the RSPCA.

The ban wasn’t supported however by the Electronic Collar Manufacturers’ Association – who warn that banning use of the collars could result in more dogs being abandoned as their owners fail to train them successfully. The collars are sometimes used in dog training; they give the dog a small shock, controlled by the owners, when the dog has misbehaved.

Elin Jones, Wales’ Rural Affairs Minister, commented on the ban of the dog collars:

It is important that owners are aware of the ban, and that they now take appropriate steps to comply with the law.

I’m pleased that as a government, we are taking a proactive approach to promoting the welfare of animals by banning the use of such electronic training devices in Wales.

According to the RSPCA, shock collars should under no circumstances be used in dog training. Rewarding dogs is a far more effective way of training dogs.

The Kennel Club offered its support of the ban by holding a display outside the Welsh Assembly building, in Cardiff Bay, yesterday. Caroline Kisko, the communications director of the Kennel Club, commented:

This is a historic day for animal welfare in Wales and we are absolutely delighted that so many AMs voted in favour of the regulations.

Today, Wales has proven that it is truly leading the way and we hope that the rest of the UK will follow by example to outlaw these cruel and unnecessary devices.

Duncan McNair, representing the Electronic Collar Manufacturers’ Association, commented that many dogs will die as a result of the ban:

It’s a bad idea because more dogs will die, more dogs will have to be re-homed and more owners will have to be distressed at having to give up their pets.

I wouldn’t dream of suggesting that people disobey the law, everybody will be making their own decision about what they do, but what I do think is that if a large number of people who use them stop using them, there will be an influx of dogs into dog shelters.

What do you think of the ban, and should it be extended to England?

3 Comments »

  1. I have had many dogs over the years and have never had any problem training them etc but last year I lost my dog that I had for 12 years. I bought another a few months later but she has been a problem. A lovely temp and very loyal but I couldn’t leave her in the garden for 5 min she would be out jumping the fence we raised it then she would dig and go under it it was unbelievable we were spending money on fencing all the time she would eventually find some way out the trouble with her getting out is she could get run over chase sheep cause all sorts of problems the RSPCA they shouldnt be wasting the money donated to them by the public. They should be spending the money on proper issues like cruelty or starving animals not wasting our money on baning these collars. They wont be getting another penny from me. The kennel club well what a bunch of old nutcases they are ok to breed dogs for show like bulldogs that cant breath just for the standard and Alsatians and other dog who get hip displacer what the RSPCA and Elin Jones going to do about that then. Anyway I bought one of these collars and a wire fence system which when installed the wire around the perimeter of your garden and you switched on the unit put the collar on the dog if she went close to the fence she would get a warning tone if she went closer a small shock she didn’t like it and soon she knew if she went to close to the fence she would have a small shock. It done the trick, she no longer gets out but now she will again thanks to brain dead people who think thay know about training dogs. There will be more dogs suffering because of this silly ruling. Where is the UK goverment for godsake stop these idiots wasting our money.

    Comment by k david — March 24, 2010 @ 3:48 pm

  2. I have tried every way possible to train my dog. He bites, runs after sheep and vehicles, jumps up at children and other dogs and won’t return when called. He also barks constantly. He’s a big dog and therefore can and will do some serious damage. I will be using a shock collar. It’s either that or wait until my dog maules some poor child or dog and then be put down. What do these people think is best a dog with some discomfort when displaying dangerous/inappropriate behaviour or a dead dog thanks to being unable to curb the behaviour? If anyone was cruel to my dog I would happily do time. I think it’s cruel to allow a dog to display such behaviour and then get put down. The RSPCA have never received a penny from me due to their complete disregard for animal life. If they cannot adopt an animal within an alloted time they murder them! What hippocrites!! As are the kennel club! Breeding dogs with deafness, hip problems, breathing difficulties, inability to give birth naturally, the list goes on. Spend time and my taxes on real problems!

    Comment by A Thomas — April 1, 2010 @ 4:06 pm

  3. they work i tryed it on myself first he is know a great dog and i do`nt feel like getting rid of him

    Comment by rob — April 23, 2011 @ 3:05 pm

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